Electroacoustic music using pre-recorded sound as the primary compositional resource. The playback can be autonomous or it can be accompanied by a musical instrument or ensemble; the fixity of the pre-recorded sound determines whether it is "tape" music or "live" electroacoustic music (i.e. triggering pre-recorded samples in a "live" setting).

Project

Move, tongue

Move, tongue is an attempt to create a non-linear space in sound, where the order of events is not important but rather the experience and perception of their coexistence. In my mind this is analogous to the act of being in a physical space (say a room or a park) and after perceiving it with whatever degree of detail, one arrives at an internal conception — a modeling — of the space.

Project

vagues / fenêtres

This piece reflects my interest in the intersection between natural and musical structures, and the nuances revealed by close listening. It also, I think, bears traces of the many hours I spent wandering with camera and recording devices through the old town and along the promenade in Nice, absorbing color, shape, movement, reflection.

Audio

Go Where (excerpt)

Posted by Matthew Goodheart on September 1, 2009

Studio produced computer music by Ushio Torikai, with analysis and synthesis by David Wessel. Produced at IRCAM in 1985, released on the CD "Go Where" (Victor, VDR-1026), by Ushio Torikai.

Project

Sabinium

Sabinium (2006)
for two-channel electronic sounds, with video animation by Harvey Goldman .

Project

Intuitivo

“Intuitivo” is a collage of free improvisations.

I recorded seven players improvising freely and separately. They received no guidelines, and they did not know what the other players would record or had recorded. Then I trimmed and juxtaposed the improvisations to create an imaginary synchronized performance.

Project

Melodrama, nach Beethoven

Beethoven’s Melodram, for glass harmonica with recitation, was composed in 1814 as incidental music for Friedrich Duncker’s drama entitled Leonore Prohaska. My Melodrama, for electronic medium, was composed in 2003 as a long coda, attached to the end of Beethoven’s trifle.

Project

Another Cascando (...that's what counts...face in the mud...)

This is a unusual piece for piano and electronics, written for Sebastian Berweck. The electronics are based of recordings of shovelling mud and the piano part involves a variety of transcriptions. Here's the original program note:

“Distance, no matter how close the object may be.” – Walter Benjamin

Project

Metronome

1999 Max/MSP sound installation for the Metronome project of Andrew Ginzel and Kristen Jones. Union Square, NYC.